The most feared song in jazz, explained

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  • Published on:  Monday, November 12, 2018
  • Making sense of John Coltrane's "Giant Steps."Follow Vox Earworm on Facebook for more: http://www.facebook.com/VoxEarwormAnd be sure to check out Earworm's complete first season here: http://bit.ly/2QCwhMHJohn Coltrane, one of jazz history’s most revered saxophonists, released “Giant Steps” in 1959. It’s known across the jazz world as one of the most challenging compositions to improvise over for two reasons - it’s fast and it’s in three keys. Braxton Cook and Adam Neely give me a crash course in music theory to help me understand this notoriously difficult song, and I’m bringing you along for the ride. Even if you don’t understand a lick of music theory, you’ll likely walk away with an appreciation for this musical puzzle. Braxton Cook: https://www.braxtoncook.com/Adam Neely: https://www.youtube.com/adamneelyNote: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing.Previous headline: Jazz Deconstructed: John Coltrane's "Giant Steps"Some songs don't just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs.Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com.Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyEFollow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06oOr Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
  • Source: https://youtu.be/62tIvfP9A2w
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  • Vox

     6 months ago

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  •  23 days ago

    Wait what? I thought I was watching a channel called Earworm...? Vox? Hey Vox, since when you do have anything non-political and decent published? Surprising. Please don't go back to fear mongering & dividing globalist devil's propaganda. Let buzzfeed do it all, they are going down soon anyways.

  • bashpr0mpt

     1 months ago

    Gosh Vox is cancer. Now I remember why I blocked their channel. Click the three vertically aligned dots, click 'not interested', click 'tell us why', click 'I'm not interested in this channel: Vox' - it will change your life. I suggest doing the same to all other extremist political propagandists LARPing as 'journalism' like Buzzfeed, and all their little secret affiliate networks they all start. Your quality of life and quality of information you get throughout your life will be improved dramatically.

  • W C

     1 months ago

    Today I learned I'm too dumb for jazz. Very interesting video.

  • thomase13

     11 hours ago

    @Nikesh Rai I have studied music theory (intensively) for years, including at the university level, and I had to pay very close attention to understand the video!

  • Nikesh Rai

     5 days ago

    haha I thought I was the only one who was struggling to comprehend the video

  • MANU ALEX

     3 months ago

    Your presentation and graphics design is out of this world. Awesome stuff

  • azaquihel

     2 months ago

    I kind of watch all of their videos ,just so i can i salivate over the editing of all of them

  • Young Paderewski

     5 months ago

    " Coltrane was somethin.' "Miles Davis

  • Sp 300

     25 days ago

    @Filthy Concertgoer Bad meaning Good???

  • John Rinton

     1 months ago

    Miles still nr. 1

  • Mount Swervemore

     1 months ago

    Going from Spanish, to Arabic, then to Japanese very quickly is probably the best explanation you can give for this composition. Imagine using those 3 languages to create a sentence that makes sense. Utterly insane.

  • Mount Swervemore

     13 days ago

    @Carta pacium It would've been cuter if you used kanji...

  • Carta pacium

     15 days ago

    Tengo mi Nissan en el aljibe :-)

  • Joanne Zo

     4 months ago

    Tommy Flanagan was told that this recording session was for a ballad and was instead handed this. Bamboozled.

  • Timothy Moore

     21 days ago

    He was like "whaaaaaat??"

  • Jas Bataille

     22 days ago

    ​@Yes Box ... you never need to a jazz session right? Who said Coltrane didn't decided on the tempo minutes before the sessions?! That wouldn't surprising. Also, you never write the tempo in an original jazz song because you the tradition is to call it on the spot... at least in bebop... like in jam sessions...Finally, Coltrane of Miles or any of those greats didn't had the time to write down a correct arrangement, they just wrote too much music. Miles was famous for bringing scribbles on the back of ...

  • ktpinnacle

     1 months ago

    I've enjoyed music for many decades. I knew that jazz was complex and advanced, but I never knew why. It was a language I didn't understand. This video did a lot as an introduction and an appreciation.

  • Legit Jester

     3 months ago

    Why does the animation and song remind me of the Monsters Inc. Intro

  • di mo ko kilala

     13 days ago

    more like remy from ratatouille when he tasted the cheese

  • Macaroni and Cliches

     2 months ago

    jazz

  • Chau Nguyen

     1 months ago

    Great explanations. I have no background in music theory but I felt comfortable through the whole video.

  • drekken hutchinson

     29 days ago

    But did you understand?

  • Moldbuggian

     1 months ago

    Go practice piano then, zipperhead

  • Adam Neely

     7 months ago

    Thanks for having me!

  •  23 days ago

    Adam, did you triple check before this video to make sure that you will not be used in a "white man culturally appropriates the black man's music!!!" video? Cuz... yknow... VOX!

  • Nick Lipsette

     28 days ago

    Daddy Neely