The New Year's Eve song, explained

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  • Published on:  Monday, December 31, 2018
  • The US associates "Auld Lang Syne" with the New Year, but not everyone does. Join the Vox Video Lab! https://www.vox.com/joinAfter the ball drops in Times Square on New Year's Eve, the crowd cheers, couples kiss, confetti flies and the song you hear is "Auld Lang Syne." For Americans this song is associated with another year passing, but it means something else entirely in other cultures. Since the Scottish poet Robert Burns first published the words to the song in the 18th century, the melody has been adapted as a soccer ballad in the Netherlands, a graduation song in Japan, and more. This video explains how an obscure Scottish folk tune took on new life around the world and how Guy Lombardo solidified it as the sound the US hears at the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com.Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyEFollow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06oOr Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
  • Source: https://youtu.be/_xWxyxsVAsQ
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Comment

  • Vox

     5 months ago

    Here's our last video of 2018! Happy New Year everyone 🍾✨✨

  • rock palace

     5 months ago

    http://www.faithfreedom.org/challenge.htm

  • kaguth

     5 months ago

    I'm going to tak a right-gud willie-waught tonight.

  • Ashraf Anam

     5 months ago

    willy *wakkhht*

  • Lili Koch

     5 months ago

    6:18 "even if you don't know the words" *shows Mariah Carey* LOL

  • spifftastic87

     5 months ago

    MAXIMUM shade lololol

  • Arvie Hernandez

     5 months ago

    "I dont know her"

  • TCsnowdream

     5 months ago

    Fun fact: in Japan, Auld Lang Syne is more widely used as a ‘the store is now closing’ song. If you stay in any department store that is closing in 10-15min, this song will come on, over the PA.

  • Huikwan Cheung

     4 months ago

    @Layla Rose Have you ever watched TV in Japan?

  • Zhi Han Lee

     5 months ago

    Somehow reminds me of my form teacher in Primary 1 (1st grade) who would sing _Sayonara_ with my class at the end of each school day

  • saiyajedi

     5 months ago

    0:25 It’s not really “about fireflies” in Japan; rather, it’s about the culmination of hard work and diligent scholarship, using a famous story from ancient China. Because of that, the song (usually in 3/4 time) is used at graduations and as an auditory cue that it’s closing time at stores and whatnot.

  • ObiWanKeighobi

     5 months ago

    saiyajedi Well that explains the store comment! The video makes brief mention to it being used at Asian graduations.

  • El bastrad

     5 months ago

    "Why are songs that people don't understand become so widespread?"*Heard of Despacito?*

  • abcd123 56

     1 months ago

    @Mystik Judgemental and filled with preconceived notions? Yess definitely

  • idk ?

     1 months ago

    ...like there aren't millions of Spanish speakers lol.

  • ToshPointFro Eats

     5 months ago

    I feel like no one really knows the song but we all kind of hum it and butcher the words drunkly 😂😂

  • David Caitens

     5 months ago

    That's the only true way as a Scot if your not butchering words then you're doing it wrong 😋

  • mikaila c

     5 months ago

    dude the ending gave me nostalgic tears

  • Bolloggfisch

     5 months ago

    It's really interesting to see how New Year Eve's celebrations differ even in the West. In Austria at midnight, every single church bell in the country starts to ring, as in all TVs and radios the Blue Danube Waltz starts playing, and a few chosen dancers dance to it in the former residence of the emperors

  • Trekki200

     5 months ago

    @Cats Cats and our choice of music around midnight is either Beethoven's 9th or the firework music by Haiden.

  • kK

     5 months ago

    @Lauren T Usually resulting in injury or death? I guess you just imagined that bit of info or something because a round fired upwards has such a slim chance of striking any thing regardless of the population in the area. Your more likely to be killed by lightning strike and prob still survive than to get wounded, let alone become a casualty of gunfire. I hope you review the source of your info as I think they may have an agenda to push. Sorry if I came across a bit harsh but its the false doctrine like...

  • PavarottiAardvark

     5 months ago

    Ok everyone, we need to get one thing clear:The line is "we'll tak a drop o' kindness here, for auld lang syne". it does NOT go "for the SAKE of auld lang syne"If you add in the 'sake', then you are singing "for the sake of old times sake", which is nonsense.

  • Lewis Carlin

     4 months ago

    @Masha Yusupova The English and Americans usually sing for the sake, I've noticed it and it always clashes with what I sing haha.

  • Cameron Smith

     5 months ago

    I’m from Scotland and this is correct never heard of ‘for sake of auld lang syne’ them yanks stealing our songs can get tae